Bioethics, cloning

>Red florescent cat cloned

>

In my day – we just belled them. Poor kitties won’t be able to catch mice. The author reminds us about the veterinarian fake cloner, Hwang Wu Suk, before he finishes.

From the Korean Times:

Researchers found a way to clone pet cats five years ago. Now they can play a trick on their genes to change their color.

A Gyeongsang National University team said they have succeeded in cloning cats after modifying a gene to change their skin color. Because of the red fluorescence protein in their skin cells, the three Turkish Angola kittens look reddish under ultraviolet light, the researchers said.

The red cloned cat research is expected to be utilized in dealing with certain genetic diseases in animals and humans. It will also help reproduce rare animals, such as tigers and wildcats, which are on the verge of extinction, the team said.

According to the team led by professor Kong Il-keun, four kittens were born in January and February by caesarian section, but one died during the procedure. They weighed between 110 and 136 grams at birth and now weigh 3.5 kilograms each now, the researchers said.

“We have proved our world-class ability in cloning animals that have modified characteristics,” said Kong. “We found that the red fluorescent protein in all the organs of the dead kitten, which means we have established an efficient way of cloning gene-modified cats.”

The first cloned cat, nicknamed Copycat, was born in 2002 at Texas A&M University. Many other animals such as cows, dogs, pigs, bulls and goats have been successfully cloned by a number of researchers in North America, Europe and South Korea.

Kong cloned a cat in 2004 for the first time in the country. He has since worked as director of research at a state-supported project to clone animals for therapeutic research.

To clone the Turkish Angola cats, Kong’s team used skin cells of the mother cat. They modified its genes to make them fluorescent by using a virus, which was transplanted into the ova. The ova were then implanted into the womb of the donor cat.

Called reproductive cloning, the method has been mostly used in cloning animals that are genetically identical, until Kong’s kittens were born with the tampered genes.

The technique differs from therapeutic cloning, which is to make a “stem cell” that can be guided to grow into a specific body part. Former Seoul National University professor Hwang Woo-suk used this method in his human stem cell cloning research, which was later found to have used fabricated data.

About bnuckols

Conservative Christian Family Doctor, promoting conservative news and views. (Hot Air under the right wing!)

Discussion

One thought on “>Red florescent cat cloned

  1. >I want one!Fish, cat.. what next? I wouldn't mind a blacklight-lit bird.I can see a slight animal wellfare concern here though… these things take UV to glow. Not a problem with cats or research animals, but with creatures like the Glofish or my hypothetical bird, owners are likely to keep them in a cage under constant illumination. Is that much UV healthy for skin or eyes?

    Posted by Suricou Raven | December 20, 2007, 2:29 pm

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